Category Archives: image transfers

Halloween Coasters

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It may only be September, but Halloween is in the air. It’s already been heavily promoted in a number of stores since August, which seems a little early, but trust the retail world to try and squeeze a few more dollars out of us. I’m jumping right in with this coaster project, which involves using Halloween inspired vintage images, transferred onto wooden bases.

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Image Transfers

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Acrylic Mediums alter acrylic paint in all sorts of interesting ways. Pouring Medium, for instance, allows the paint to flow so it can be poured onto surfaces, and dry without cracking. I used this medium to make Halloween SkinsPumpkin Decorations, and some Gerhard Richter inspired paintings. 

Another medium, Glass Beads Gel, adds a glossy, bead-like texture to your work, and can be mixed with acrylics or added on top. This medium added a perfect finish for Painting A Galaxy, and a fun texture to Puzzle Piece Pins.

Recently, I picked up some Acrylic Gel Medium which not only alters the texture of acrylic paint, but enables you to transfer printed images onto other surfaces, making it ideal for creating layers in collages and mixed media. In this instance, I simply used it as an adhesive to transfer images onto a box and future pencil holder. It turned out to be super easy to work with.

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Cyanotype Prints

Cyanotype printing, also known as sun printing, is a technique which was discovered in 1842 by scientist Sir John Herschel. At the time, it was used primarily to reproduce engineering and architectural drawings. When the botanist Anna Atkins learned of the process, she used it to document plant life from her collection, and is credited with bringing the process to the world of photography.

The process is fairly simple. Chemically treated surfaces like paper and fabric are exposed to sunlight, a chemical reaction takes place, and you’re left with fascinating silhouettes on beautiful blue backgrounds. While this normally requires mixing chemicals, pre-treated papers are available, making it easy and safe to involve children.

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