Tag Archives: DIY

Fibre Art Collage

Fibre art can take on many forms like weaving, quilting, collage and sculpture, and is best defined as “any artistic presentation with fibre as the main medium.” That leaves things pretty open, so I decided to make these collages monochromatic so kids could work on their colours. I also included bubble wrap, the first thing I found lying in my recycling junk box. It turns out to be really easy to sew, adds great texture, and works nicely with any colour grouping. And if the urge to pop becomes overwhelming, virtual bubble wrap is the place for you.

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Filed under collage, fibre art, textiles

Dioramas

It’s not surprising children love to make dioramas. It remains one of those classic school projects, where they can dream up a moment in time, an imaginary miniature world, filled with tiny characters and decor, all contained in a little box.

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Painted Eggs

Painting eggs is a popular activity and tradition this time of year, and there’s no shortage of styles to explore. Think of intricate and detailed designs on Ukrainian Easter eggs, experiments with marbling, speckling and layering, wonderful little characters emerging from creative minds, and of course the unexpected. Artists provide inspiration for so many things, so why not for eggs?

The American artist, Roy Lichtenstein, was born in 1923 and was well known for his work in the Pop Art style. For a number of years, he adapted images from comic books and turned them into large-scale paintings filled with thick black outlines, primary colours, and lots and lots of dots. Dots, comics, and bright colours? Sounds like a winning combination to entice children into a little egg painting.

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Filed under Artists, eggs, painting, Pop Art, Roy Lichtenstein

Textured Painting

Jean Dubuffet was a French artist whose work included paintings and large-scale sculptures. He used a range of unconventional materials such as sand, pebbles, and butterfly wings, and was often inspired by found objects, patterns, and textures. He was also drawn to the powerful work created by children, prisoners and psychiatric patients, who had received no formal training in art. This prompted him to coin the term Art Brut to refer to their art, which was filled with a spontaneity and freedom he greatly admired and was inspired by. Let’s celebrate that spontaneity and freedom children have by playing with plaster and creating some textures.

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Filed under Artists, Jean Dubuffet